Newsroom

News Release Archive

November 20, 2005 - 6:00pm

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Tuesday, Nov. 22















Thomas C. Dorr, Under Secretary for Rural Development with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, will speak about his vision for rural development and renewable energy at 9:30 a.m. in Room 109 of the Curris Business Building. Dorr also will visit ABIL, UNI's Ag-Based Industrial Lubricants program, in Waverly. Dorr was appointed to his position by President George W. Bush, and sworn into office in July. Rural Development consists of three program areas -- business, utilities and housing -- that provide $14 billion annual funding authority for loans, grants and technical assistance to rural residents, communities and businesses and an $87 billion portfolio of existing business, housing and infrastructure loans to rural America. Dorr served previously in several leadership roles within the USDA's Rural Development division. A member of the Iowa Board of Regents from 1991-1997, Dorr has broad agricultural, financial and business experience. He has served as a member of the 7th District Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and as a member and officer of the Iowa and National Corn Growers Associations. Prior to his current service at the Department of Agriculture, Dorr was president of a family agribusiness company, consisting of a corn and soybean farm, a state licensed commercial grain elevator and warehouse, and two limited liability companies. From Marcus, Iowa, Dorr is a graduate of Morningside College with a B.S. degree in business administration. Contact: Patricia Geadelmann, special assistant to the president /board and governmental relations, (319) 273-6144.















Debut Recital for the Graduate Piano Quartet from Russia, 6 p.m., Davis Hall, Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center. Members are Elena Dorozhkina, Tatiana Patina, Denis Kalinnikov and Phillipe Gulidov, with assistance from UNI faculty members Frederick Halgedahl, Julia Trahan and Jonathan Chenoweth. The concert includes piano quartets by Beethoven and Dvorak and a string sextet by Brahms. Contact: Jonathan Chenoweth, associate professor, UNI School of Music, (319) 273-2780.































Thanksgiving vacation begins, 10 p.m.































Thursday-Friday, Nov. 24-25















UNI offices closed for Thanksgiving holiday.















Monday, Nov. 28















Instruction resumes, 8 a.m.















Thursday, Dec. 1















'Celebrate the Seasons,' a celebration of cultural holidays throughout the world, 7 p.m., Maucker Union. Activities and food will represent many of the seasonal holidays throughout the world. Included will be free sleigh rides around campus and a visit from Santa. Contact: Mike Bobeldyk, program coordinator, UNI Maucker Union, (319) 273-5888 or mike.bobeldyk@uni.edu















A naming ceremony for the 'Josephine J. Megivern Historic Costume Collection,' part of the UNI Museum and Collections, will be held at 7 p.m. by the Department of Design, Textiles, Gerontology, & Family Studies in Latham Hall 222. The department currently houses the historic collection, started by Megivern in 1979, following receipt of a grant for that purpose. It is unique in its special emphasis on collecting regional dress styles worn in the rural Midwest. As a teaching collection, it provides students with unique opportunities for artifact analysis of dress styles worn by real people in this part of the United States. Department Head Howard Barnes says this exposure helps UNI students better understand the difference between national fashion trends and dress as worn in distinct communities during a given historical time period. Though she retired from UNI in 1987, Megivern continued to work on organizing and documenting the acquisitions until shortly before her death in September 2004. Contact: Howard Barnes, associate professor and head, UNI Department of Design, Textiles, Gerontology, & Family Studies, (319) 273-2358.















Friday, Dec. 2















From 2 to 4 p.m., the University Museum, 3219 Hudson Road, Cedar Falls, will host a panel of travelers who will share ways to travel while minimizing the impact on the local environment in 'A Better Way to See the World: Traveling as an Eco-Tourist.' The discussion will include interesting, yet slightly uncommon, destinations. Contact: University Museums, (319) 273-2188.















Monday, Dec. 5















'Three Ways to Take Down: Alternate Masculinities in Youth and High School Wrestling' will be discussed during the CROW (Current Research on Women) Forum, at noon in the Maucker Union South Room. Presenters are Phyllis Baker, UNI associate professor of sociology, and Marybeth Stalp, UNI assistant professor of sociology. Contact: Phyllis Baker, (319) 273- 2221 or Marybeth Stalp, (319)















273-6235.















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Winter weather impacts driving decisions















Winter weather can create hazardous road conditions, so people traveling during the holidays need to be prepared for the unexpected. Milissa Wright, UNI Public Safety associate director, suggests drivers plan extra time for a trip and be courteous to other drivers.















'If you try to hurry when the roads are snowy or icy, you are more likely to lose control of your vehicle and be in an accident. Slow down,' she says. 'Keep extra distance between yourself and the car ahead of you. If the car ahead of you loses control you'll have more time to take evasive action.'















Wright, who teaches precision driving, says if you start to lose control of your vehicle, let off the gas and let the car coast rather than hitting the brakes right away. Slow the car by pumping the brakes. If you start to skid, steer in the direction of the skid to correct it.















Wright recommends keeping a flashlight, shovel, blankets, nonperishable food and water in a vehicle in case you get stranded.















'If you end up in the median or ditch, stay away from the roadway while signaling for assistance. If you have a cell phone, call for help from your car,' she says. 'Be cautious if someone stops to help. Don't accept rides, but rather ask the person to send help to you. If you must spend the night in your car, only run the car periodically for heat and occasionally check to make sure the exhaust is clear from snow.'















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November 16, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Psi Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi International Honor Society in Education announced the fall 2005 semester scholarship recipients.































New members awarded $1,200 Kappa Delta Pi Education Scholarships were Kelly Marie Clemen, Cory Chelious Johnson, and Jason Eugene Lippard.















Clemen is a junior elementary education major and literacy minor from Dubuque, and is the daughter of Rod and Donna Clemen.















Johnson is a junior social science education major and music minor from Donnellson, and is the son of Joanne Johnson.















Lippard is a senior English major from Ames, and is the son of Rick and Carol Lippard. Lippard also holds a bachelor of arts in music from Iowa State University and a master of music in music performance from the University of Akron. He also is the recipient of the $1,700 Ethel R. Taylor Kappa Delta Pi Creative Writing Teaching Scholarship.































Receiving the $1,000 Myrle M. Burk Kappa Delta Pi Science Education Scholarship was Kristin Rae Jorgensen of Bettendorf, a junior general science education major. Jorgensen is the daughter of Alan and Jill Jorgensen.































The $500 Karen Ewoldt Kruse Kappa Delta Pi Education Scholarship went to Kappa Delta Pi member and Chapter Secretary Shannon Marie White, a junior elementary education major and literacy education minor from Newton. White is the daughter of Timothy and Susan White.































The $500 Stephen J. Fortgang Kappa Delta Pi Chapter Service Scholarship was awarded to Kappa Delta Pi member and Kappa Delta Pi Elementary Partnership Program Chair Emery Brooke Burton Tew of Williams, an elementary / early childhood major and literacy education minor. She is the daughter of Mike and Charlene Burton.















According to Stephen Fortgang, UNI associate professor of education and Kappa Delta Pi adviser, all UNI Kappa Delta Pi scholarships are the result of efforts by student members who have been calling alumni members in weekly phone-a-thons throughout each academic year since 1982.































For more information, contact Fortgang at (319) 273-2049, or Stephen.Fortgang@uni.edu.















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November 15, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Nebraska Street on the University of Northern Iowa campus, which runs next to the UNI-Dome and McLeod Center, has been renamed Panther Parkway, university officials announced today.















'This is a great change, and something we've wanted for quite a while,' said UNI Director of Athletics, Rick Hartzell. 'Panther Parkway adds additional weight to the brand of UNI Panther athletics.'















Panther Parkway runs parallel to Hudson Road, in between the UNI-Dome, McLeod Center and the West Athletic Fields.















The McLeod Center is scheduled to open in November 2006. The McLeod Center will be home to Panther volleyball, men's and women's basketball and the competition site for Panther wrestling. It also will be a versatile venue for community and regional events, including concerts, exhibitions, school events, sports camps and competitions. ###















































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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Center for Energy & Environmental Education (CEEE) at the University of Northern Iowa is taking entries for its annual Iowa Energy Poster Contest, open to all Iowa children in grades one through six.















According to Patricia Higby, energy educator at UNI's CEEE, the students will create posters that focus on the importance of energy conservation or renewable sources of energy.















In addition to the statewide energy poster contest, schools, utility providers or other organizations interested in energy efficiency and renewable energy sources, also may organize their own local poster contest, and are encouraged to call the CEEE for free assistance, according to Higby. Local winning posters will be submitted to the state contest. A suggested deadline for a local contest is Feb. 15, 2006. Entries can be submitted directly to the statewide competition, postmarked by March 15, 2006, or to a local contest by the local deadline.















Statewide poster contest winners will be honored at a ceremony at the State Capitol. Their work also will be showcased in the CEEE Traveling Energy Art Gallery, which is displayed in schools, museums and businesses.















For more information on the Iowa Energy Poster Contest, contact Holly Kagy, poster contest director, at (319) 273-3850, or visit www.uni.edu/ceee/postercontest.















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November 13, 2005 - 6:00pm

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Monday, Nov. 14















IHSAA Football Playoffs Semi-finals, UNI-Dome. 2A games: 10:30 a.m., Sigourney-Keota vs. North Fayette, West Union and 1:30 p.m., Sheldon vs. PCM Monroe. 3A games: 4:30 p.m., LeMars vs. Harlan and 7:30 p.m., Williamsburg vs. West Delaware, Manchester. Contact: Jason Nellis, UNI-Dome facilities coordinator, (319) 273-5871 or e-mail unidome@uni.edu.















Monday, Nov. 14 - Friday, Nov. 18















UNI will celebrate American Education Week with a series of related events presented in several area schools by UNI faculty, staff and students. This year's theme is 'A Strong America Starts with Great Public Schools.' Contact: Stacey Christensen, UNI community relations manager, (319) 273-3170 or E-mail Stacey.Christensen@uni.edu















International Education Week at UNI will include a number of special presentations and programs as UNI joins universities nationwide to celebrate the important contributions of international education and exchange to the community and the nation. Among activities will be a rap group on international and social issues and a presentation by the International Club of Students of Business. The International Student Association is offering language classes. A complete schedule is posted on the Study Abroad Web site at http://fp.uni.edu/studyabroad/news/iew2005.asp. Contact: Yana Cornish, UNI Study Abroad Program coordinator, (319 273-7078 or e-mail yana.cornish@uni.edu.















Native American Heritage Month activities continue throughout the week. Visit http://fp.uni.edu/cme/nahm_events .htm for a complete schedule.















Tuesday, Nov. 15















The first topic in a continuing series on 'Civic Discourse and Opposing Views' will focus on 'Should there be a draft?,' from 4 to 5:30 p.m. in Schindler Education Center Room 252. The series seeks to promote the development of civic discourse skills on important social issues by focusing on understanding opposing views. Participants will argue both sides of an issue and then engage in discussion with members of a panel. Talking points for both sides will be provided. Contact: Geraldine Perreault, director, UNI Leadership Studies Program, (319) 273-6898.















Native American Heritage Month keynote speaker, Elizabeth Cook-Lynn, will speak on 'History, Myth, and Identity in the New Indian Story,' at 7 p.m., in Lang Hall Auditorium. One of the writers of the 20th-century Native American Literary Renaissance, Cook-Lynn is the author of many novels, poetry books, and short stories. She was awarded the Myers Center Award for the Study of Human Rights in North America, in 1997. ( Cook-Lynn















Since her retirement from Eastern Washington University, she has been a visiting professor and consultant in Native American Studies at Arizona State University at Tempe, and a writer-in-residence at several universities. This presentation is sponsored by the Center for Multicultural Education. Contact: Lydia Perez Roberts, CME assistant director, (319) 273-2250, e-mail lydia.roberts@uni.edu. For more information, visit http//:fp.uni.edu/cme/nov.htm















Wednesday, Nov. 16















Wal-Mart Watch Forum, 7 p.m., 102 Sabin Hall, will feature sweat shop workers from four continents speaking on Wal-mart's labor rights policies. They will discuss their battles to win basic rights such as unions and a living wage. Sponsored by Amnesty International and UNI Students for Social Justice. Contact: Laura Greenwood, vice president, UNI Students for Social Justice, (319) 273-2942.















Thursday, Nov. 17















From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., near Sabin Hall, smokers are invited to 'Go Cold Turkey' by turning in their cigarettes for a six-inch turkey sub. This is Great American Smokeout Day. Contact: Andrew Salgado, (515) 360-3565















Friday, Nov. 18















IHSSA Football Playoffs Finals, UNI-Dome. Games at: 9:30 a.m. - 8-Player Championship; 12:30 p.m. - Class A Championship; 3:30 p.m. - Class 1A Championship; 7:30 p.m. - Class 4A Championship.















Contact: Jason Nellis, UNI-Dome facilities coordinator, (319) 273-5871, or e-mail unidome@uni.edu.















Saturday, Nov. 19















IHSSA Football Playoffs Finals, UNI-Dome. Games at: 10 a.m. - Class 2A Championship; 1 p.m. - Class 3A Championship. Contact: Jason Nellis, UNI-Dome facilities coordinator, (319) 273-5871, or e-mail unidome@uni.edu.















Sunday, Nov. 20















UNI Men's Basketball will play Western Carolina at 6:30 p.m. in Wells Fargo Arena, Des Moines, as part of the Mediacom Two Rivers Shootout doubleheader. Drake will play Detroit, at 4 p.m., in the first game. A pre-game party for all UNI fans will begin at 5 p.m. in rooms 1-3 of the HyVee Hall, part of the new Iowa Events Center, located at 703 Third St., Des Moines. Contact: Stacey Christensen, UNI community relations manager, (319) 273-3170, or E-mail Stacey.Christensen@uni.edu















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A Wal-Mart Watch Forum will take place at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 16, in Room 102, Sabin Hall, on the University of Northern Iowa campus, sponsored by UNI's Amnesty International and Students for Social Justice.































Sweatshop workers from four continents will speak on Wal-Mart's labor rights policies, and will discuss their battles to win basic rights such as joining a union and earning a living wage, according to Laura Greenwood, UNI Amnesty International co-president and junior sociology major from Davenport.































The event is open to the public and free of charge.















For more information, contact Greenwood at greenwood16@gmail.com.















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November 9, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- International Education Week will be celebrated on the University of Northern Iowa campus, Monday through Friday, Nov. 14 through 18. The week will include a number of special presentations and programs as UNI joins universities nationwide to celebrate the important contributions of international education and exchange to the community and the nation.















Activities include African drumming and dance; a belly dancing presentation; salsa dance lessons and demonstrations, a hip-hop performance by United Naytionz; and a UNITUBA ensemble performance. Free language lessons in Arabic, Korean and Italian; and $5 sushi cooking lessons will be offered by the International Student Association. All events are open to the public.















African drumming and dance, under the direction of Dr. Randy Hogancamp, will take place Monday, Nov. 14 and Friday, Nov. 18, both at 8 a.m., in Davis Hall, Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center.















From noon to 1 p.m., Monday, Nov. 14, the belly dance presentation and demonstration will take place in the Hemisphere Lounge, Maucker Union.















Salsa dance demonstrations, lessons and a movie, sponsored by the Hispanic Latino Student Union, will take place from 7 to 10 p.m., Monday, Nov. 14, in Ballroom A, Maucker Union.















United Naytionz will perform from 3 to 5 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 16, in Maucker Union's Hemisphere Lounge. According to Chris Scharge, UNI instructor in management, United Naytionz is a socially and politically correct rap group that spreads goodwill through the art of hip-hop.















The UNITUBA ensemble will perform at 8p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 16, in Davis Hall, Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center.































Italian language lessons will be offered from 5 to 6 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 16, in the SIAC Conference Room, Maucker Union. Arabic lessons will take place on the same day, from 5:30 to 6 p.m., and from 6 to 6:30 p.m., Korean lessons will take place in the College Eye Room, Maucker Union.















Sushi cooking lessons will be offered from 7 to 8 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 16, in the Bartlett Hall Recreation Room. Tickets are $5, and the lessons are limited to 25 participants. Contact Thu Mai for tickets at thumai@uni.edu. Tickets cover the cost for two rolls of sushi and a bamboo mat.















According to Yana Cornish, UNI study abroad coordinator, IEW is a joint initiative of the U.S. Departments of State and Education to prepare American students for a global environment and promote international exchanges.















For more information, contact Cornish at yana.cornish@uni.edu, or (319) 273-3034. For a complete list of activities, visit http://fp.uni.edu/studyabroad/news/IEW2005.asp.















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November 8, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Center for Multicultural Education (CME) will feature a film series in honor of Native American Heritage Month.

'The Right to Be,' a documentary filmed by a 61-year-old Lakota at Standing Rock Reservation, whose goal is to produce honest, realistic portrayals of her people, will be shown every half hour from noon to 5 p.m., on Tuesday, Nov. 15, in the CME.

On Wednesday, Nov. 16, in the CME, 'Whose Child Is This?,' a documentary, will be shown every half hour from noon to 5 p.m., It tells the story of Native American children who were separated from their parents and adopted by both well-meaning and exploitative families after Indian tribes were vanquished and their cultures were destroyed by the U.S. and Canadian governments.

The documentary 'Black Indians: An American Story,' will be shown every half hour from 1 to 5 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 17, in the CME. According to Roberts, the film brings to light a forgotten part of America's past -- the cultural and racial fusion of Native and African Americans. Narrated by James Earl Jones, (who is himself a Black-Indian-American), this presentation explores what brought the two groups together, what drove them apart, and the challenges they face today.

Refreshments will be served at each film showing.

For more information on Native American Heritage Month Film Series, contact Roberts at

(319) 273-2250 or Lydia.Roberts@uni.edu, or visit www.uni.edu/cme.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'History, Religion & Humanity: A Summary of 30+ Years of Teaching,' will be the topic of The Last Lecture Series at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 15, in The Great Reading Room in Seerley Hall, on the University of Northern Iowa campus. The Last Lecture Series, sponsored by the UNI Campus Activities Board (CAB) Speakers Committee, is free and open to the public.































James Robinson, UNI associate professor of religion, will deliver the lecture. Robinson completed his undergraduate work in philosophy and religion at Wabash College, Crawfordsville, Ind., and finished his graduate work in Buddhist studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Robinson teaches both Religions of the World and Humanities in the Liberal Arts Core, and also teaches advanced courses in Asian religions, meditation and the mystical experience, and angels across cultures. He has been teaching at UNI since 1971.















According to Maggie Shonrock, a senior finance major from Ames and a member of the CAB Speakers Committee, professors are free to prepare a lecture on any topic -- ranging from emotional to hilarious, but always moving and inspiring. This program provides professors with the opportunity to reflect upon their years of teaching and life experiences, and offer advice to students. The series also helps connect students with the central purpose of a college education -- the encouragement of intellectual curiosity.















Refreshments will be served at the lecture.















For more information, contact Mindy Meacham, CAB Speakers Committee member, at melindam@uni.edu.















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November 7, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The Iowa Consortium for Applied Gerontology at the University of Northern Iowa will offer free memory screenings on Tuesday, Nov. 15 in the Meditation Room in UNI's Maucker Union. Appointments can be scheduled between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. The screenings are offered as part of National Memory Screening Day, an annual event presented by the Alzheimer's Foundation of America.































Individual memory screenings take approximately 10 minutes and consist of questions and tasks to assess memory. They do not diagnose illness, but can indicate if a follow-up medical exam is necessary, which could lead to an early detection of a memory disorder.















This event is free and open to those interested or concerned with their own memory or that of another. For more information, or to schedule an appointment for a screening, contact Amy Unruh, UNI Iowa Consortium for Applied Gerontology coordinator, at (319) 273-7961 or amy.unruh@uni.edu.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Should there be a draft?' will kick off a new series at the University of Northern Iowa titled 'Civic Discourse and Opposing Views,' at 4 p.m., Tuesday Nov. 15, in the Schindler Education Center, Room 252 on the UNI campus. The series is designed to promote responsible citizenship, leadership, and the development of civic discourse skills on social issues of importance by focusing on understanding opposing views.















Following a format in which participants can engage in a discussion, presenting pros and cons of important social issues, those attending will be provided a list of talking points regarding the reinstituting of the military draft and will be asked to participate in pairs, presenting and listening to both sides of the argument. No advance preparation is needed by participants. The program also will feature a panel and final discussion.















'Civic Discourse and Opposing Views,' is sponsored by the UNI American Democracy Project, UNI Department of Military Science, UNI Civility Committee, UNI Leadership Studies Program and UNI Students for Social Justice. The series is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided.















Those planning to attend are asked to RVSP if possible to Gerri Perreault, UNI associate professor of leadership studies and co-chair of the UNI American Democracy Project, at















(319) 273-6898 or at YLA@uni.edu, and are asked to type 'opposing views' in the subject line if inquiring about this event via e-mail.















November 6, 2005 - 6:00pm

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Monday, Nov. 7















A 'Community Symposium,' part of the state's 'Celebrate Voting' project and the 40th anniversary celebration of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, will begin with a 10 a.m. keynote address by Dr. Ron Walters, director of the African American Leadership Institute. Walters, a frequent media commentator on voting rights issues, is also Distinguished Leadership Scholar at the James MacGregor Burns Academy of Leadership and professor in government and politics at the University of Maryland. An 11:30 a.m. lunch session will include a presentation on the voting rights struggle by Skywalker Payne, professional storyteller, and the symposium will conclude with a 1 p.m. panel on the future of voting rights and citizen participation. Contact: Allen Hays, director, UNI Master's of Public Policy Program, (319) 273-2910.















CROW Forum: 'Thread Sister: Anna Grostol's Legacy for Today's Textile Artists,' noon to 1 p.m., Maucker Union South Room, presented by Carol Colburn, UNI professor of theatre. Contact: Colburn at 319-273-2390.















Scandinavian dance lessons, 7 p.m., in Maucker Union Old Central Ballroom, are co-sponsored by UNI Folk and Ballroom Dancers and the Cedar Valley Sons of Norway. The free dance lessons are offered the first and third Mondays of each month. Contact: Kathleen Kerr, professor of physical education, (319) 273-6195.















IHSAA Football Playoffs Quarterfinals, UNI-Dome, Class A - West Hancock, Britt vs. Valley, Elgin 6:15 p.m.; Class 4A - Cedar Rapids Kennedy vs. Cedar Falls, 8:45 p.m. Contact: Jason Nellis, UNI-Dome facilities coordinator, (319) 273-5871, or E-mail unidome@uni.edu















Tuesday, Nov. 8















'The Iowa Experience,' a three-week course, part of the Lifelong University offerings, will meet from 10 to 11:30 a.m., in Classroom 30, Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center. The course will examine 159 years of Iowa migration, politics and Iowa experiences. . Contact: Stacey Christensen, UNI community relations manager, (319) 273-3170 or E-mail stacey.christensen@uni.edu















IHSAA Football Playoffs Quarterfinals, UNI-Dome, Class 3A - West Delaware, Manchester vs. Decorah, 6:15 p.m.; Class 2A - Solon vs. North Fayette, West Union, 8:45 p.m. Contact: Jason Nellis, UNI-Dome facilities coordinator, (319) 273-5871, or E-mail unidome@uni.edu















Wednesday, Nov. 9















Walt Whitman Celebration, noon to 9:30 p.m., various campus locations, with a keynote address, as part of the Meryl Norton Hearst Lecture Series, by Ed Folsom, Carver Professor of English, University of Iowa, at 2:30 p.m., Lang Hall Auditorium, 'What We Are Still Learning About the First Edition of Walt Whitman's 'Leaves of Grass' 150 Years Later.















Other activities include an open mic session, an introduction to the Whitman hypertext archive, a roundtable on approaches to teaching Whitman in high school and college classrooms and an evening musical performance. For more information, visit www.uni.edu/english/whitman or call Julie Husband, UNI assistant professor of English, (319)















273-3849.















The Northern Iowa Management Association is sponsoring an 'etiquette dinner' at 5:30 p.m. in the Georgian Lounge of the UNI Commons. The event includes a formal dinner and an etiquette presentation by Dale Cyphert, UNI associate professor of management. Contact: Angela Ott, (319) 222-0164 or Cyphert at (319) 273-6150.















The Second Annual Soup's On Fundraiser for the UNI Museums will be held from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., in St. Stephen's Student Center, 1019 West 23rd St., Cedar Falls, sponsored by the Friends of the UNI Museums. Visitors will have an opportunity to taste soups from around the world, including Moroccan Vegetable, West African Peanut, Italian Sausage & Fennel and Eastern Mediterranean Spinach & Rice. A silent auction will take place during dinner. Contact: UNI Museums, (319) 273-2188.















Thursday, Nov. 10















'From Novel to Film: The Art of Adaptation,' one in a series of Lifelong University offerings, will meet from 9 to 10:30 a.m., in Classroom 30 at the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center. The workshop will examine the difference between the written story and film images, and how cinematic adaptation can be successful without being faithful to a source, and faithful without being successful. Contact: Stacey Christensen, UNI community relations manager, (319) 273-3170 or E-mail stacey.christenen@uni.edu.















Native American Heritage Month activities include a workshop at noon on the 'History and Meaning of Native American Pow Wows,' at the Center for Multicultural Education on the upper level of Maucker Union (Room 109). Visit www.uni.edu/cme/nov.htm for more information and a schedule of activities.















'Catastrophe and Community: Lessons on Citizenship,' will be discussed by a panel of university members, community leaders and a student directly affected by Hurricane Katrina, at 6:45 p.m., in the CEEE Auditorium. Following the panel, participants, in small groups, will discuss issues raised. A reception, at 5:45, will precede the panel, in the CEEE Lobby. The panel is the fall offering of the College of Social & Behavioral Sciences' outreach program, 'The Changing Face of Iowa,' that centers, this year, on citizenship. Contact: Phyllis Baker, associate dean, UNI College of Social & Behavioral Sciences, (319) 273-2221.















Friday, Nov. 11















Native American Heritage Month activities include a workshop from 9 to 10 a.m. on 'Recruitment, Retention and Meeting the Needs of Native American Students in Higher Education,' in the Center for Multicultural Education, upper level of Maucker Union (Room 109), and a Haskell Indian Nation Dance Performance, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Old Central Ballroom, Maucker Union. Visit www.uni.edu/cme/nov.htm for more information and a schedule of activities.















IHSAA Football Playoffs Semi-finals, UNI-Dome: Games at 10:30 a.m. (1A), 1:30 p.m. (1A),















4:30 p.m. (4A), and 7:30 p.m. (4A). Contact: Jason Nellis, UNI-Dome facilities coordinator, (319) 273-5871 or E-mail unidome@uni.edu















Saturday, Nov. 12















IHSAA Football Playoffs Semi-finals, UNI-Dome: Games at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m., Class A. Contact: Jason Nellis, UNI-Dome facilities coordinator, (319) 273-5871 or E-mail unidome@uni.edu















The 3rd International Capoeira Conference will include the Capoeira Grand Show and Belt Testing/Martial Arts, from 7 to 9 p.m., in the West Gym. Contact: Pedro Zogaib (319) 273-7344.















Monday, Nov. 14















IHSAA Football Playoffs Semi-finals, UNI-Dome. 2A games at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. 3A games at 4:30 and 7:30 p.m. Contact: Jason Nellis, UNI-Dome facilities coordinator, (319) 273-5871 or E-mail unidome@uni.edu















Monday, Nov. 14 - Friday, Nov. 18















International Education Week at UNI will include a number of special presentations and programs as UNI joins universities nationwide to celebrate the important contributions of international education and exchange to the community and the nation. Among activities will be demonstrations of belly dancing, salsa and African drumming as well as opera workshops. A complete schedule is posted at http://fp.uni.edu/studyabroad/news/iew2005.asp. Contact: Yana Cornish, UNI Study Abroad Program coordinator, (319 273-7078 or E-mail yana.cornish@uni.edu.















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November 3, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Alumni and Friends of Price Laboratory School (AFPLS) will hold its annual fall gathering and silent auction, and honor four outstanding alumni, from 6 to 8:30 p.m., Saturday, Nov. 12, in the Georgian Lounge, on the UNI campus.















The evening begins at 6 p.m. with a social hour, silent auction, hors d'oeuvres and a cash bar. According to Michelle Hyde Swanson, AFPLS event chairperson and Price Laboratory School (PLS) instructor in teaching, the silent auction includes items and services, baskets of wine and chocolate; professional lessons; prints autographed by artists; party opportunities -- swimming, play station, basketball; Principal-for-a-day; lodging; iPod nano, bicycle, Iowa Hawkeye football tickets and UNI Panther football tickets. The general public can make absentee bids online at http://www.pls.uni.edu/swanson/silentauctionitems.htm until midnight, Nov. 11.















The program starts at 7:30 p.m., and at 8:30 p.m., silent auction item winners will be announced. Northern University High School graduates being honored this year are Jim Landau, '75; and, Jodi Landau, '76, both restaurateurs; Devin McKinney, '85, a writer; and, William Washington, '77, an entrepreneur.















Outstanding alumni are chosen each year based on their dedication to children, their contributions to the educational system, their accomplishments since graduation and their contributions to Price Laboratory School.















The 2005 Extraordinary Emeriti are Tim Cooney, Jim Kelly, the late Al Potter, the late Walt Gohman and Harold Wengert. They were all part of a team that taught in the PLS secondary science department.















The emcee for the evening is Gary Kroeger, '75. The emeritus chairperson is Becky Wilson Hawbaker and the event chairperson is Michelle Hyde Swanson, both '87 alumnae and current instructors at Price Laboratory School.















The AFPLS Board of Directors are Swanson; Hawbaker; Curt Nielsen and Lynne Ensworth, both UNI instructors in teaching; Dave Smith, associate PLS director; and, alumni Polly Primrose Jacobson; Jim Miller; and, Kristen Teig Torres.















The event is open to the public. Reservations are preferred, but are not necessary. To purchase advance tickets and to make reservations, call (319) 273-2600.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Department of Art will present 'Contemporary Trends in Painting in St. Petersburg: a Lecture by Andrey Korolchuk' at 3 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 17, in the Kamerick Art Building (KAB), Room 111. A reception will follow in the KAB lobby, accompanied by a mini-exhibition of the artist's work. Titled 'Plastic Realism,' the exhibition will continue through Dec. 10. The events are sponsored by the UNI Office of International Programs.































Korolchuk is associate professor and chair of drawing at Herzen State Pedagogical University, located in St. Petersburg, Russia. Korolchuk also is a member of the Union of Artists and vice president of the St. Petersburg Society of Watercolorists. He has participated in more than 150 exhibitions in Russia and abroad. His works may be found in private collections in Finland, Sweden, Germany, Norway, Austria, Denmark and Mexico, as well as the United States. In 1995, he was awarded the State Grant of the President of the Russian Federation, and in 2001, he was honored by the St. Petersburg Society of Watercolorists for 'development of art in watercolor.'































These events are free and open to the public. The Kamerick Art Building is located at the northeast corner of Hudson Road and West 27th Street. For more information, call (319) 273-2077.















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November 2, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Capoeira sport club and Cedar Valley Capoeira members will host the 3rd International Capoeira Conference and Educational Workshops, Nov. 10-13, with 15 visiting masters from Brazil teaching Capoeira workshops.































Capoeira is Afro-Brazilian martial arts integrated with dance, ritual and acrobatics.















The workshops will take place Thursday, Nov. 10, from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m., in Rooms 185 and 187, in the Wellness and Recreation Center (WRC), located on the UNI campus.















Friday workshops will take place from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., at the YWCA, 425 Lafayette Street, in downtown Waterloo. Saturday workshops will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., also at the YWCA in Waterloo. The Grand Capoeira show will occur from 7 to 9 p.m. at the West Gym on the UNI campus.















On Sunday, the closing ceremony will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Center for Multicultural Education (CME), upper level of Maucker Union at UNI.















Admission to the Grand Capoeira show is free. The weekend-long educational workshops fee is $100, which includes food and a t-shirt. A single day of workshops is $60, which does not include a t-shirt. A single workshop is $15, which does not include a t-shirt. T-shirts are $15.















For more information, contact Francesca Zogaib, YWCA health promotions services director, at Francesca@ywcabhc.org or (319) 290-5503; or Pedro Zogaib, UNI adjunct instructor in physical education and UNI Capoeira sport club instructor, at Pedro.Zogaib@uni.edu.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Catastrophe and Community: Lessons on Citizenship,' will be discussed by a panel of university members, community leaders and a student directly affected by Hurricane Katrina, at 6:45 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 10, in the Center for Energy & Environmental Education (CEEE) Auditorium on the University of Northern Iowa campus.















The event is part of 'The Changing Face of Iowa,' an outreach program of UNI's College of Social & Behavioral Sciences. This year's topic is citizenship, with the panelists focusing specifically on recent natural disasters. A 5:45 p.m. reception will precede the panel, in the CEEE Lobby. Both events are free and open to the public.















Panelists include Germaine Jackson, a UNI graduate student from New Orleans; Guy Sims, interim director of Maucker Union; John Baskerville, UNI associate professor of history; and the Rev. Mary Robinson, Eastside Ministerial Alliance. Michele Yehieli, director of the Iowa EXPORT Center of Excellence for Health at UNI, will moderate the panel.















The panel is expected to stimulate discussion of questions such as 'What is the meaning of citizenship in the context of community?'; 'Who is my neighbor and how do I determine this?'; and 'Who gets included or excluded and why?'















Following the panel, participants, in small groups, will have the opportunity to discuss these and other issues, in an effort to understand the implications of recent events for local, national and global citizenship.















For more information, contact the UNI College of Social & Behavioral Sciences at (319)















273-2221.















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November 1, 2005 - 6:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Iowa high school art students and their teachers will be on the University of Northern Iowa campus Friday, Nov. 4, for the annual High School Art Scholarship Competition Day, sponsored by the UNI Department of Art. Students will compete for art scholarships ranging from $1,000 to $3,500.































During the day, they will have an opportunity to attend demonstrations and workshops presented by UNI art faculty members, have guided tours of the Kamerick Art Building (KAB) and view the UNI Faculty Art Exhibit in the Gallery of Art. Financial aid representatives also will be present to talk about scholarships and other financial aid at UNI.































Following a 9 a.m. welcome, in the Art Auditorium, Room 111 KAB, by Steve Taft, acting head of the UNI Department of Art, a keynote address will be delivered by Gillian Christy, formerly from Davenport, a 2002 UNI studio-art graduate with an emphasis in sculpture. She is part of the Locker Residency Program at The Steelyard in Providence, R.I., a non-profit organization whose goals are to teach industrial arts to adults, teens and children. Christy is one of three resident artists, creating art work and teaching metal-fabrication courses.































Her high-profile works include three-dimensional graphic images fabricated for Scott Duncan Films for CBS; Broadway Video; the NFL on CBS 2003-2005; and for the hit reality show, 'The Apprentice,' on NBC. She custom fabricated the three-dimensional graphic used in the opening of 'The Apprentice' and used for NBC promotional purposes. She also has been commissioned to create public art on the smokestack of an historic building in the Olneyville area of Providence.































Taft will announce scholarship recipients and alternates at 3:15 p.m., in the Art Auditorium.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- A one-day celebration in honor of the 150th anniversary of the first printing of Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass, will be hosted by the University of Northern Iowa, Wednesday, Nov. 9, on the UNI campus.































Activities begin with open mic from noon to 1 p.m., at the Center for Multicultural Education (CME). Students, faculty and the public are invited to share their Whitman-inspired creative work.































The introduction to the 'Walt Whitman Hypertext Archive' will take place from 1:30 to 2:15 p.m., in Room 23, Lang Hall. The archive includes many photographs of Whitman, critical articles, an audio of Whitman reading, and more. The archive also is available online at http://www.whitmanarchive.org.































The keynote address, 'What We Are Still Learning About the First Edition of Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass 150 Years Later,' which is part of 'The Meryl Norton Hearst Lecture Series,' will be delivered by Ed Folsom. Folsom is the editor of the 'Walt Whitman Quarterly Review,' and the author of 'Walt Whitman's Native Representations.'































A roundtable on teaching Walt Whitman will take place from 4 to 5:30 p.m., in Room 211, Lang Hall. Discussion leaders include high school and college teachers reflecting on approaches to Walt Whitman's works in the classroom.































'A Musical Celebration of Leaves of Grass,' will take place from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. in Lang Hall Auditorium. Artsongs, dance and more music will be performed by featured artists including Sarah Duvel, a UNI senior music performance major from Cedar Falls; Leslie Morgan, UNI associate professor of music; Jonathan Schwabe, UNI associate professor of music; Bob Washut, UNI professor of music; Jason Weinburger, conductor of the Waterloo-Cedar Falls Symphony; the Orchesis Dance Company, under the direction of Michelle Ozmun, UNI instructor in physical education; the UNI Concert Chorale, under the direction of Nicole Lamartine, UNI assistant professor of music; and Bill Koch, UNI instructor in English language and literature, as Walt Whitman.















Events are free and open to the public.































Support for this celebration comes from the Office of the Provost, the Graduate School, the College of Humanities and Fine Arts, the College of Education, the UNI Department of English Language and Literature, the UNI School of Music, the UNI Department of History and the UNI Women's Studies Program.































For more information or to get involved with the celebration, contact Julie Husband, UNI assistant professor of English language and literature, at (319) 273-3849 or Julie.Husband@uni.edu; or Koch at (319) 273-6231, or William.Koch@uni.edu; or visit www.uni.edu/english/whitman/.















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October 30, 2005 - 6:00pm

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Tuesday, Nov. 1















'The Iowa Experience,'10 a.m. - 11:30 a.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center, Classroom 30. One of the offerings in the Lifelong University series, this three-week course will examine 159 years of Iowa migration, politics and Iowa experiences. Contact: Stacey Christensen, UNI community relations manager, (319) 273-3170 or E-mail stacey.christensen@uni.edu.















Tuesday, Nov. 1 - Wednesday, Nov. 30















During November, visit the Native American Heritage Month Library and Artifact Displays at the Center for Multicultural Education (CME) Lobby, 109 Maucker Union, and Rod Library. For information on other Native American Heritage Month events visit: http://fp.uni.edu/cme/nahm_events.htm. Contact: Lydia Perez Roberts, CME assistant director, (319) 273-2250 or E-mail lydia.roberts@uni.edu















Wednesday, Nov. 2















The Office of Career Services is sponsoring a 'Dress for Success' program, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Maucker Union Hemisphere Lounge. Students getting ready for interviews can get tips on how to dress, how to accessorize, what to take and not to take to the interview and also ideas on resume and cover letter writing. Contact: Josey Spallarossa, program assistant, UNI International Services Office, (319) 273-2862 or E-mail majospa@uni.edu















Native American Heritage Month Workshop: 'Cross Cultural Communication and the Native American Culture,' noon to 1 p.m., Center for Multicultural Education, 109 Maucker Union, led by Raymond Slick, Meskwaki tribal member and cross cultural educator. Slick teaches cross-cultural communication workshops throughout the state. The workshop will include a lecture, video, and Q&A. Contact: Lydia Roberts, CME assistant director, (319) 273-2250 or E-mail: lydia.roberts@uni.edu















IHSSA Football Playoffs will be in the UNI-Dome today with games at 6:15 & 8:45 p.m. Contact: Jason Nellis, UNI-Dome facilities coordinator, (319) 273-5871 or E-mail: unidome@uni.edu.















Thursday, Nov. 3















The Wellness Program will present Dr. Gary Sherman, D.C., Advance Chiropractic, who will speak on 'Headaches: The Causes and Cures,' at noon in the Presidential Room of the Maucker Union. Contact: Kathy Green, director, University Health Services, (319) 273-6921.















Thursday, Nov. 3 - Friday, Nov. 4















The annual Iowa Industry and Technology Education Conference, being held this year in Ames, brings together technology and industrial technology educators at the secondary, community college and university levels to learn about the latest in their fields. Educational innovations will be discussed and the program includes exhibits and tours designed to generate a renewed enthusiasm for students and subject matter. Sponsored by the Iowa Industry & Technology Education Association, UNI Department of Industrial Technology and the Iowa Department of Education, and facilitated by UNI Conference & Event Services. Contact: UNI Conference & Event Services, (319) 273-6899 or 800-782-9519, or E-mail conf-events@uni.edu.















Friday, Nov. 4















The cast of BLAST!, 35 brass, percussion and visual performers brought together in a unique explosion of music and theatre, will conduct a free master class at noon, in the GBPAC's Great Hall. During this lecture and demonstration, the cast will warm-up, rehearse and perform parts of the show they are performing at the GBPAC Nov. 3 and 4. Contact: Amy Hunzelman, GBPAC outreach/education director, (319) 273-3679.















Saturday, Nov. 5















Old Skool Skate Night. 'Loops for Lupus', 7 to 10 p.m., at the Black Hawk Rollerdome, sponsored by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. All proceeds to Lupus Foundation of America. Contact: Jennifer at (319) 222-0395.















Sunday, Nov. 6















History of the Panama Canal, 2 p.m., presented by the University Museum, 3219 Hudson Road, Cedar Falls. Ken Lyftogt, UNI lecturer in history, will discuss the history of the building of the Panama Canal, and the resulting creation of Barro Colorado Island. Denny Mills, tourist traveler through the Canal will show his slides of the area. Contact: Kay Thuesen, public affairs coordinator, University Museum, 319-273-2188.















Sunday, Nov. 6 - Monday, Nov. 7















A two-day celebration of the 40th anniversary of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, reflecting the past and present African American voting experience in Iowa, begins with a 'Community Dinner,' at 5:30 p.m., Sunday, at Payne Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Church, 1044 Mobile St., Waterloo. Rev. Joseph E. Lowery, civil rights pioneer and cofounder with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, will deliver a keynote address. Monday's 'Academic Symposium' will begin with a 10 a.m. keynote address by Dr. Ron Walters, director of the African American Leadership Institute and frequent media commentator on voting rights issues. He also is Distinguished Leadership Scholar at the James MacGregor Burns Academy of Leadership and professor in government and politics at the University of Virginia. The 11:30 a.m. lunch session will include a presentation on the voting rights struggle by Skywalker Payne, professional storyteller, and the symposium will conclude with a 1 p.m. panel on the future of voting rights and citizen participation. Contact: Allen Hays, director, UNI Master's of Public Policy Program, (319) 273-2910.















Monday, Nov. 7















High School Art Scholarship Competition Day in the Department of Art begins at 9 a.m., with a keynote presentation by UNI art alumnus Gillian Christy, in the Art Auditorium, Room 111 Kamerick Art Building. Demonstrations, workshops and an exhibition of candidates' work is featured during the day, with scholarship recipients announced at 3:15. Contact: Steve Taft, acting head of art, (319) 273-2077.















CROW Forum: 'Thread Sister: Anna Grostol's Legacy for Today's Textile Artists,' noon to 1 p.m.,















Maucker Union South Room, presented by Carol Colburn, UNI professor of theatre. Contact: Colburn at 319-273-2390.















Scandinavian dance lessons, 7 p.m., in Maucker Union Old Central Ballroom, are co-sponsored by UNI Folk and Ballroom Dancers and the Cedar Valley Sons of Norway. The free dance lessons are offered the first and third Mondays of each month. Contact: Kathleen Kerr, professor of physical education, (319) 273-6195.















IHSAA Football Playoffs, UNI-Dome, 6:15 and 8:45 p.m. Contact: Jason Nellis, UNI-Dome facilities coordinator, (319) 273-5871 or E-mail: unidome@uni.edu.































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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Three University of Northern Iowa staff members have received the 2005 Staff Excellence Awards, given by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa.















Recipients are Steve Carignan, executive director of the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center (GBPAC); Barbara Shepard, office coordinator for Wellness & Recreation Services; and Sarah Miller, former catering and conference coordinator for the UNI Department of Residence, now conference and events scheduling coordinator at Wartburg College.















The awards are presented annually to staff members in the professional & scientific ranks, and biennially to a member of the supervisory/confidential merit personnel, who have demonstrated outstanding professional contributions to UNI during their careers. Candidates are nominated by their colleagues and peers. This year's recipients will be honored, along with colleagues from the other Regent institutions, at a reception and dinner on the University of Iowa campus Wednesday, Nov. 2, during the meeting of the Board of Regents, State of Iowa.















Carignan has 'modeled the way and demonstrated excellence in all he does,' wrote his nominator Janelle Barnett Darst, marketing director at the GBPAC, in summarizing his six years at UNI. 'Steve believes in and promotes the University's goals and mission,' she said.















He has collaborated with numerous departments and programs on campus, such as a campaign with athletics that focused on arts and athletics; the School of Music and Department of Theatre on the productions of 'Sweeney Todd' and 'The Magic Flute,' that allowed both students and faculty to work and perform in a world-class facility; and 'Kaleidoscope Connections,' between the GBPAC and the College of Education, where UNI students plan, develop, apply and evaluate lesson plans to be used as enrichment to the Kaleidoscope school-time performances.















He has been active throughout the campus, serving on the Professional & Scientific Council and as its president, on the Executive Council for Iowa Public Radio, the UNI Speaker's Bureau and with programming through Human Resource Services; participating in the Campus Conversations, on the Leadership Studies Advisory Board, and as a KHKE on-air fundraising volunteer, and regularly attends athletic events with his family. He is active in Chamber of Commerce activities, the Cedar Valley Cultural Alliance, and with other nonprofit organizations in the community.















'But, by far, one of the most important things is that he has embraced UNI and everyone involved with the campus as family,' Darst said.















Shepard strives for excellence in all that she does, wrote her nominator, Kathy Green, director of University Health Services and Shepard's immediate supervisor. 'She is particularly attentive to providing quality customer service to the students, faculty and staff who use Wellness & Recreations Services facilities and participate in our programs,' Green said. 'Barb strives to build and maintain good working relationships with other departments, is a good teacher to WRS staff. . . and takes extreme pride in her work and in the success of WRS as a whole.















'She takes initiative to consider ways we can improve our service, explore new ideas and improve efficiencyï¾…. Her experience, intelligence and active involvement demonstrate her leadership within the department. I particularly admire Barb because of her loyalty to UNI and the University Health Services. She doesn't focus narrowly on the responsibilities assigned, but has a positive attitude and eagerness to be part of the success of the department and UNI in general.















Shepard is president of the Supervisory/Confidential Merit Personnel employee group and a member of the Campus Advisory Group, and has taken an active role in providing feedback and suggestions for effective implementation of the university's new financial management system.















Shepard has served in various positions at UNI, including some temporary posts, for more than 30 years. She joined campus recreation in 1985 and was named office coordinator in Wellness & Recreation Services in 1997.















Miller worked at UNI for 12 years, joining dining services to help plan catering events in 1997. In nominating Miller, her supervisor, Margaret Empie, former assistant director of dining services/ catering and retail, cited Miller's overall excellence; customer service mentality; positive attitude toward clients, projects and staff; her personal attention to detail; and professional recognition. Empie wrote, 'She represents us to the university and to the community, and is a key player in our catering reputation in the community.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Teaching Women's and Gender Issues in the Classroom: Faculty Talk About Teaching Women's Studies Courses' will be the topic of the next Women on Fridays event at noon, Friday, Nov. 4, in Baker Hall, Room 161, on the University of Northern Iowa campus.































Speaking on their experiences teaching gender issues in the classroom will be Barbara Cutter, UNI assistant professor of history; Samuel Gladden, UNI associate professor of English language and literature; and, Jennifer Waldron, UNI assistant professor of physical education.















This informal presentation and discussion is free, and open to the public.































The Women on Fridays lecture series is sponsored by UNI's Undergraduate Program in Women's Studies, and is designed to create opportunities to discuss women's and gender issues, according to Susan Hill, director of the UNI Undergraduate Program in Women's Studies.















For more information, contact Hill at (319) 273-7195, or Susan.Hill@uni.edu.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Thread Sister: Anna Grost�l's Legacy for Today's Textile Artists' will be the topic of the next CROW Forum lecture at noon, Monday, Nov. 7, in Maucker Union, South Room, on the University of Northern Iowa campus.































Carol Colburn, UNI professor of theatre, will deliver the lecture. Colburn will talk about Anna Grost�l, who assembled an archive of film, photo, artifact and written records that documented women's textile work from hand weaving to dressmaking in rural Norway. 'Such an archive is not only representative of Norwegian textile work, but also of hand weaving and dressmaking activity from 1850 to 1950 in Northern Europe and North America,' said Colburn. Grost�l assembled a picture of this aspect of our foremother's lives, many of whom were considered to be master weavers and dressmakers in their communities, according to Colburn. The presentation will include examples of how this information can be pertinent to our lives today.















Colburn received her master's in textiles and clothing and her Ph.D. in design, both from the University of Minnesota Graduate School. Colburn has been teaching in the UNI Department of Theatre since 1981.















This informal presentation and discussion is free, and open to the public.































The CROW (Current Research on Women) Forum series is sponsored by UNI's Graduate Program in Women's Studies.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Two senior University of Northern Iowa textile and apparel students, Erin Dixon of Oskaloosa and Brittany Lester of Cedar Rapids, were recipients of $1,000 scholarships from Lands' End.































The scholarships were given based on academic standing, leadership ability and potential contribution to the textile and apparel industry. Both students are design show directors this year and plan to go into product development and design post graduation.















UNI textile and apparel students and graduates have a long history of job placement with Lands' End, with students working in product development, textile design, apparel design, merchandising and product testing, according to Annette Lynch, UNI associate professor of textiles and apparel.































For more information, contact Lynch at Annette.Lynch@uni.edu.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa ï¾– Northern University High School will present 'Singin' in the Rain' in Butzier Auditorium of Malcolm Price Laboratory School, at 7 p.m., Friday and Saturday, Nov. 4 and 5.















The play cast, crew and orchestra involves 30 Northern University Middle and High School students, and several University of Northern Iowa students. Two UNI students choreographed the show and several UNI students and a parent are members of the orchestra.















'Something unique about this production is the range of ages involved, which serves as sort of a 'mentoring' process into theater,' said Linda Sharp, UNI assistant professor of teaching at Price Laboratory School and NU High choral director.















'Singin' in the Rain' is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI, 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019. MTI can be reached by phone at (212) 541-4684, or by fax at (212) 397-4684, or visit www.MTIShows.com.















Tickets, available at the door, are $6 for adults and $5 for students. For more information contact Jolene Tagtow, UNI instructor in teaching at Price Laboratory School, at (319) 273-2594 or jolene.tagtow@uni.edu.















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October 27, 2005 - 7:00pm

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The Board of Regents, State of Iowa, will meet Wednesday and Thursday, ?Nov. 2 and 3 at the University of Iowa, in Iowa City. Specific times for discussion of most items are unknown. The docket is available on the Web at http://www2.state.ia.us/regents/Meetings/Agendas/agenda.html















1. Annual report on technology transfer and economic development















Will be discussed at the Economic Development Committee meeting.















Contact:















Randy Pilkington, executive director, UNI Business & Community Services, (319) 273-6941















2. Comprehensive fiscal report for fiscal year 2005















Residence system annual report will be included in this report.















Contact:















Renee Romano, vice president for educational & student services, (319) 273-2331















Michael Hager, director of residence, (319) 273-2333















Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration & finance, (319) 273-2382















3. Notice of intent to search















UNI will begin national searches to fill three key administrative positions: associate vice president for sponsored programs; College of Natural Sciences dean; and provost and vice president for academic affairs. While permission to search for a new provost is being requested, advertising the position will be delayed until after a new UNI president has been appointed.















Contact:















Robert Koob, president, (319) 273-2566















4. Professional development assignments and report















Will be discussed at the Human Resources Committee meeting.















Contact:















James Lubker, interim provost and vice president for academic affairs, (319) 273-2517















5. Register of capital improvements















Will be discussed at the Property and Facilities Committee meeting. Approval requested for architect/engineer agreements for:















a. Multimodal Transportation Facility















b. Russell Hall renovation -- permission to proceed with project planning















Contact:















Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration & finance, (319) 273-2382















6. Semiannual claims activity report















Will be discussed at the Audit Committee meeting.















Contact:















Robert Koob, president, (319) 273-2566















7. Tuition and fees















The proposed increase in student-fees puts UNI slightly higher than Iowa and Iowa State. However, when all the costs associated with attending the university are factored in -- including room and board -- UNI remains the least expensive of the three state institutions.















Proposed 2006-07 resident tuition and fees -- plus current room and board















Iowa State University $11,993















University of Iowa $11,938















University of Northern Iowa $11,431















Contact:















Robert Koob, president, (319) 273-2566















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Three faculty members were honored at the University of Northern Iowa fall faculty meeting for outstanding teaching, research and professional service.















Recipients, and the award they received, each valued at $1,000, are:















Russell Wiley, assistant professor of chemistry, the Class of 1943 Award for Excellence in Teaching, that not only rewards effective performance in the classroom, but also generosity with personal time and a serious concern with academic excellence and individual student needs, interests and development;















Kent Sandstrom, professor of sociology, the Ross A. Nielsen Professional Service Award, presented in honor of his exceptional service record to the university, his discipline and the community; and,















Martin Agran, formerly professor and interim head of special education, now at the University of Wyoming, the Donald N. McKay Faculty Research Award. A nationally recognized scholar in the field of special education, his primary contribution has been in the development of a process where people can assume an active role in controlling their own lives (self determination).















Wiley has been a member of the UNI faculty for 37 years. 'When I think of a great teacher, Russ is the first person who comes to mind,' wrote his nominator, Shoshanna Coon, interim head of the Department of Chemistry. 'I would go so far as to say that he has had a larger impact on more chemistry students than any other person in our department.'















She said in spite of grading daily quizzes and weekly lab reports or notebooks for some 90 students, 'he still has time for students outside of class. . . It is a measure of how his students feel about him that more than 90 percent of the people in his General Chemistry II classes took General Chemistry I from him. Good students love to learn for and from Russ.















'Russ devotes a large amount of personal time to helping students,' said Coon. 'It is rare to be able to talk to him for more than 10 minutes without a student coming to his office door. He will bend over backward to help a student who is trying to improve. . . Perhaps the thing that amazes me the most about Russ Wiley is that after all these years, he's still excited about the chemistry he is teaching and is still developing new ways to teach it.'















Sandstrom has been a member of the UNI faculty member for 12 years. 'Faculty serve their universities, disciplines and communities,' wrote Joe Gorton, UNI associate professor of criminology. 'It is the rare professor who has an exceptional service record to all three constituencies. Professor Kent Sandstrom has such a record' . . . and his 'professional service clearly merits special recognition.'















Sandstrom was elected as the executive officer of the Midwest Sociological Society (MSS), the largest regional association of sociologists in the United States, in April 2002, and in the past 38 months. He has devoted more than 1,800 hours of service to that organization. He also has served as director of the student paper competition for MSS and been a member of the MSS program committee. He has served on a number of editorial boards for scholarly journals and as a reviewer for more than a dozen others.















Sandstrom has been equally active on campus, serving on more than a dozen university and departmental committees, and had a letter of support for this award from the officers of the UNI Chapter of Amnesty International. His extensive record of community service includes being a member of the State of Iowa's HIV/AIDS Prevention Community Planning Group and a consulktant mto the Iowa Policy Institute.















Agran's nominator, Frank W. Kohler, UNI associate professor of special education, wrote that his (Agran's) work 'has been instrumental in changing our educational system from one where teachers make all of the executive decisions to a self-directed approach where students take responsibility for their own choices and decisions. This process of self-determination has not only improved the quality of life for people with disabilities, but has made a profound impact on federal legislation and programs of teacher preparation.'















In addition, Agran has an extensive publications record and secured nearly $4.5 million in 20 research grants since 1984. He also served on numerous review committees for federal grant agencies, has been editor-in-chief for three different special education journals and established scholarly relationships with special educators from Russia, Korea and the former Czechoslovakia.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Native American Heritage Month will be celebrated at the University of Northern Iowa with a series of films, speakers and workshops on Native American history presented by the UNI Center for Multicultural Education (CME), located in the upper level of UNI's Maucker Union.

Activities kick off on Wednesday, Nov. 2, from noon to 1 p.m., with 'Cross Cultural Communication and the Native American Culture,' the first of three workshops to take place during November, in the CME, Room 109 Maucker Union. Raymond Slick, Meskwaki tribal member and cross-cultural educator, will direct the workshop. According to Lydia Perez Roberts, UNI assistant director of the CME, the workshop will include a lecture, video and a question and answer session. Slick earned his bachelor of social work at the University of Iowa and has taught cross-cultural communication workshops throughout the state.

'Smoke Signals,' a film about two mismatched young men living on the same Indian reservation in Idaho who take a road trip together to collect the remains of one man's father, will continue the monthly 'Late Night at the CME' series of cultural films also Wednesday, Nov. 2, from 9 to 11 p.m., in the CME. Refreshments, pillows and blankets will be provided for comfortable viewing.

'The Pow Wow Spirit: The History and Meaning of Native American Pow Wows,' the second of three workshops, will take place Thursday, Nov. 10, from noon to 1 p.m., in the CME. The workshop will be directed by Dean Whitebreast, Meskwaki tribal member and pow wow coordinator. According to Roberts, Whitebreast will share his knowledge about pow wows and its cultural relevance to Native American's social and family life in the past and today.

The third workshop, 'Recruitment, Retention, and Meeting the Needs of Native American Students in Higher Education,' will take place Friday, Nov. 11, from 9 to 10 a.m., in the CME. Manny King, registrar at Haskell Indian Nation University in Lawrence, Kan., will deliver the workshop. According to Roberts, King will discuss the innovative curricula oriented toward American Indian and Alaska Native cultures offered at Haskell. 'Its intertribal constituency and federal support through the Bureau of Indian Affairs makes Haskell unique, and provides exciting challenges as Haskell moves into the 21st century,' said King.

The Haskell Dance performers from Haskell Indian Nation University will provide an explanation and demonstration of various, unique dance styles found in North American tribes, Friday, Nov. 11, from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the Old Central Ballroom in UNI's Maucker Union. The performance includes hoop dancers, Apache dancers and a flute player with performers dressed in traditional dance regalia. Pop and dessert will be provided, those attending are asked to bring a lunch if desired.

On Tuesday, Nov. 15, award-winning Native American Literary Renaissance author, Elizabeth Cook-Lynn will present, 'History, Myth and Identity in the New Indian Story,' at 7 p.m., in the Lang Hall Auditorium. Her works include three novellas, a collection of short stories, two poetry chapbooks, and a full-length book of selected and new poems. A reception and book-signing will follow the presentation.

'The Right to Be,' a documentary filmed by a 61-year-old Lakota at Standing Rock Reservation, whose goal is to produce honest, realistic portrayals of her people, will be shown every half hour from noon to 5 p.m., on Tuesday, Nov. 15, in the CME.

On Wednesday, Nov. 16, in the CME, 'Whose Child Is This?,' a documentary, will be shown every half hour from noon to 5 p.m. It tells the story of Native American children who were separated from their parents and adopted by both well-meaning and exploitative families after Indian tribes were vanquished and their cultures were destroyed by the U.S. and Canadian governments.

The documentary 'Black Indians: An American Story,' will be shown every half hour from 1 to 5 p.m., Thursday, Nov. 17, in the CME. According to Roberts, the film brings to light a forgotten part of America's past -- the cultural and racial fusion of Native and African Americans. Narrated by James Earl Jones, (who is himself a Black-Indian-American), this presentation explores what brought the two groups together, what drove them apart, and the challenges they face today.

Throughout November, Native American Heritage Month library and artifact displays will be on view in the CME Lobby and at Rod Library.

For more information on Native American Heritage Month, contact Roberts at (319) 273-2250 or Lydia.Roberts@uni.edu or visit www.uni.edu/cme.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Theatre UNI will present Thornton Wilder's 1938 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama, 'Our Town,' Friday through Sunday, Nov. 11-13, and Thursday through Sunday, Nov 17-20, at UNI's Strayer-Wood Theatre.















'Our Town' is a classic allegorical representation of life set in the fictional town of Grover's Corners, N.H.















'This is a poetic tale of young love, small town life, and the fragility of life,' says Jascenna Haislet-Carlson, marketing director for Theatre UNI. 'It appeals to audiences today with its central themes of morality, family, community and tradition.'















'Our Town' is directed by Richard Glockner, UNI associate professor of theatre, and features an ensemble cast of 22 UNI students playing nearly 50 roles. Members of the audience also will be invited to participate in a town hall meeting scene.















The production features scenery and sound designs by Mark A. Parrott, UNI theatre designer and instructor; costume design by Jenny Nutting-Kelchen, Theatre UNI alumna; lighting design by Chad Kolbe, Theatre UNI program assistant; and hair and makeup designs by Ashley Frett, senior theatre major from Eldora.















Cast members include Joshua Mulladay, a senior theatre major from Cedar Falls, as the stage manager; the roles of Emily and George, the young sweethearts, will be played by Mandie Pirog, a freshman history major from Ames and Anthony Soike, a senior theatre major from Des Moines.















Other cast members include UNI students, Bradley Borrison of Camanche, Tom Hoy of Cedar Falls, Nick Halder of Cherokee, Melissa Cameron of Council Bluffs, Irene Gallin of Davenport, Derek Johnson of Delhi, Derk Babbitt of Earlham, Joe Kelly and Mark Paar of Eldridge, Sam Garles of Fairfield, Jolene Enke of Hancock, Becca Wagoner of Maquoketa, Maura Hashman of Story City, Ben Kaas of Sumner, Jeff Cumberlin of Vinton, and Malgorzata Kubicka and Wojciech Tremiszewski, both of Poland.















Show times for 'Our Town' are 7:30 p.m. Nov. 11, 12, 18, and 19; 2 p.m. Nov. 13 and 20; 10 a.m. Nov. 17 and 18. Tickets are $12 for adults, $8 for youth and may be purchased by calling















(319) 273-6381 or online at http://www.theatreuni.com.















For more information, contact Haislet-Carlson at (319) 273-6387















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October 26, 2005 - 7:00pm

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Photo opportunity: media tour of Gilchrist Hall -- Monday, Oct. 31















The media are invited to tour UNI's Gilchrist Hall at 2 p.m., Monday, Oct. 31. This will be the only opportunity in the near future to tour the building.















Meet at the loading dock door on the south side of Gilchrist Hall. Parking will be available in the loading dock lot. To limit additional soot damage, each media outlet will be limited to one reporter and one photographer. The tour will begin promptly at 2 p.m.















The latest Gilchrist Hall update is available on the Web at http://www.uni.edu/pubrel/gilchrist.shtml















For background, low-resolution photos taken the day after the fire are available on the Web at http://www.uni.edu/pubrel/gilchristfire/















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October 25, 2005 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Wellness and Recreation Services (WRS) has selected Amanda L. Walston, a senior leisure youth and human services major from Vinton, as the spring 2006 WRS scholarship recipient. The scholarship amount is $400.















Walston works in the Wellness and Recreation Center (WRC) Resource Lab and serves as a resident assistant (RA) in Noehren Residence Hall. She also was a WRS student employee of the month in February 2003.















Scholarship applicants were required to complete an application, write an essay and secure letters of recommendation from their professional supervisor(s).































The WRS scholarship is sponsored by Kathy Green, director of University Health Services/WRS, in honor of four generations of women from her family who have graduated from UNI. The scholarship is awarded twice a year, each fall and spring semester.















For more information, contact Tim Klatt, associate director of WRS, at Timothy.Klatt@uni.edu.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa debate team opened its competitive season earlier this month at Missouri State University, in Springfield, Mo.















Team members Mark Langgin, a senior from Ottumwa; and, Ian Beier, a sophomore political science major from Kansas City, Mo, finished in fifth place by advancing to the quarterfinal round. Langgin ranked as the third overall speaker at the tournament, and Beier placed eleventh.















The team of Kelsey Harr, a senior sociology major from Des Moines; and, Paul Montreuil, a social science teacher education major from Boise, Idaho, also finished in fifth place by advancing to the quarterfinal round. Harr ranked as the sixth overall speaker at the tournament.































This year's National Debate Tournament/Cross Examination Debate Association debate topic is 'Resolved: The United States Federal Government should substantially increase diplomatic and economic pressure on the People's Republic of China in one or more of the following areas: trade, human rights, weapons nonproliferation, Taiwan.'















For more information, contact Jake Thompson, UNI director of forensics, at (319) 273-7200 or Jake.Thompson@uni.edu.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Constant Change!' will be the topic of The Last Lecture Series at 7:30 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 1, in Room 115, Seerley Hall, on the University of Northern Iowa campus. The Last Lecture Series, sponsored by the UNI Campus Activities Board (CAB) Speakers Committee, is free and open to the public.















Victoria Robinson, UNI associate professor of educational leadership, counseling and postsecondary education, will deliver the lecture. Robinson began her career in education in 1971 as a high school history teacher. In 1993, she left the classroom to serve as principal of Northern University High School, Cedar Falls; and, in 1999, she joined the UNI Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling and Postsecondary Education, where she teaches future principals. Robinson also directed UNI's involvement in a five year Title II Grant, 'Improving Teacher Quality,' a joint effort of 10 universities. Internationally, her experiences include three studies in the Middle East and presenting teacher workshops in Chile.















'After 34 years in education, I have finally identified what I really do,' Robinson said. 'I am a connector. I connect people to people, people to opportunities, people to ideas, and people to themselves.'















According to Maggie Shonrock, a senior finance major from Ames and a member of the CAB Speakers Committee, professors are free to prepare a lecture on any topic -- ranging from emotional to hilarious, but always moving and inspiring. This program provides professors with the opportunity to reflect upon their years of teaching and life experiences, and offer advice to students. The series also helps connect students with the central purpose of a college education -- the encouragement of intellectual curiosity.















Refreshments will be served at the lecture. The next 'last lecture,' at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15, will feature James Robinson, UNI associate professor of religion.















For more information, contact Mindy Meacham, CAB Speakers Committee member, at melindam@uni.edu.















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October 24, 2005 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLSï¾—Ladene Bowen CEcD, senior project manager for the University of Northern Iowa's Institute for Decision Making, has been named Fellow Member of the International Economic Development Council (IEDC), during the organization's annual conference Sept. 26, in Chicago.















Fellow Member (FM) status is conferred on active IEDC members making significant contributions through service to the Council or academic endeavors related to the field of economic development. A Fellow holds the classification as long as IEDC membership is maintained.































Bowen, who has been at UNI since 1990, serves as the primary contact for Iowa communities that request assistance in economic and community development. Among her areas of responsibility are community needs assessment, community marketing, strategic economic and community development planning and many others.































Prior to coming to UNI, Bowen was executive vice president of the Butte (Mt.) Chamber of Commerce. She holds a bachelor's degree in industrial psychology and business administration, completed a six-year program in organizational management at the University of Colorado and is a 1992 graduate of the Economic Development Institute, University of Oklahoma. She earned her Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) designation from the American Economic Development Council in 1993.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Facilities Services has found that having student employees work alongside full-time staff keeps operations running efficiently. Facilities Services develops and operates campus buildings and grounds and keeps the university environment safe.































'UNI promotes employing students in its departments, and the Facilities Services staff has embraced this idea and found it mutually beneficial. In a time of rising tuition and cost of living, students can work with professional staff, reduce travel time to work by working on campus, and get a new perspective of the university,' said Michael Zwanziger, facilities planner and coordinator for the Facilities Coordination Center.































'Without student support, many of the advancements we have been making would be compromised,' said Cindy Houlson, university safety manager. 'Employing students is a win-win situation. We gain the assistance needed to attain and maintain a successful level of safety compliance, and the students leave UNI with the opportunity to apply the knowledge they've received in the classroom.'































More than 100 students worked for Facilities Services in various capacities during the past year. Campus Services, which includes the Mail Center, Transportation Services and Motor Pool, employed 30 students; Building Services employed 54 students to help keep the interior of buildings looking sharp. One student worked at the Power Plant, seven students helped Operations and Maintenance and four students worked in the HVAC shop. Area Maintenance employed three students during the summer to work on construction in McCollum Science Hall, the Communication Arts Center, Gilchrist Hall and in the swimming pool operation areas. Twenty-one students worked for Grounds over the summer, which allowed the professional staff to take on several major landscape installation projects.















Four students provide drafting, interior design and archiving assistance for Design and Construction and get professional experience in their fields. One student currently works for the Safety Office, which has provided internships and co-op experiences for students in the past.































'Students have many opportunities to contribute to UNI while getting an education,' Zwanziger said. 'Working on campus is just another way they can give back while they earn money and experience.'















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October 23, 2005 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The 2005 Fall Ethics Conference on Health Disparities will take place Wednesday, Nov. 2, from 11:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the McBride Auditorium in Gerard Hall at the Allen College Campus located at 1950 Heath St. in Waterloo. The conference is intended for physicians, nurses, social workers, clergy, faculty and students in healthcare-related positions.































The conference will examine the issues related to health care at local, state, national and international levels and their affect on certain populations. Among the topics covered will be a review of the changes in local and national demographics, advocacy for systematic changes that promote equitable health care for all, and discussion of inherent challenges of health care delivery.































There is a $20 registration fee for the conference and $5 for students and retirees. Participants are eligible for continuing education credits. A light lunch is included. A registration form and explanation of available credit for CME physicians and CEU nurses is available at www.allencollege.edu. No phone-in registrations accepted. A certificate of completion will be issued for four hours of attendance. Conference participants must attend the entire session to receive credit.































Registration deadline for the conference is Wednesday, Oct. 26. For more information, contact Francis Degnin, UNI assistant professor of history and religion, at (319) 273-3015 or visit www.allencollege.edu.































The 2005 Fall Ethics Conference is sponsored by Allen College, Covenant Health System, Allen Health System, the Medical Education Foundation and the University of Northern Iowa.















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Monday, Oct. 24 - Friday, Oct. 28

Day of the Dead Altar and Documentary: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Center for Multicultural Education (109 MAU). Visit the Day of the Dead Altar throughout the day in the CME lobby. A documentary on this ancient tradition, that honors the dead, will play daily, every half hour from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For more information on this tradition and other CME events visit: http://fp.uni.edu/cme/hh_month.htm. Contact: Lydia Perez Roberts, (319) 273-2250, or email lydia.roberts@uni.edu.

Monday, Oct. 24

'Berenstain Bears,' 10 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center Kaleidoscope Series for Youth, sponsored by Allen Hospital. More than 3,500 pre-kindergarten through third grade students will attend the two 60-minute shows that have curriculum connections to literature, relationships and music. Based on the five best selling Bear books, this original musical by Stan and Jan Berenstain includes favorite stories from 'Messy Room,' 'Get in a Fight,' 'Double Dare,' 'New Baby' and 'Stage Fright.' Contact: Janelle Darst; email: janelle.darst@uni.edu; phone: (319) 273-3676. Tickets: $1

Earth Science Seminar, 4 p.m., Latham 125, 'What's the Big Deal with Einstein, Anyway?,' presented by Tom Hockey, UNI professor of astronomy, as part of the year-long celebration of the achievements of Albert Einstein. Contact: Hockey at (319) 273-2065, or email: thomas.hockey@uni.edu.

Tuesday, Oct. 25

Autumn-matic Wellness Fair 2005, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Wellness & Recreation Services, courts 5 and 6. More than 45 campus and community organizations and businesses will participate with information and giveaways highlighting an array of health and wellness topics. Among offerings will be chair massages, derma scans, body composition testing, oral cancer screenings, hearing tests and more. Contact: Deedra Billings, (319) 273-7162.

Hispanic Heritage Month Fiesta, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Center for Multicultural Education (109 Maucker Union), will feature a free authentic Mexican dinner and live mariachi music. For more info visit: http://fp.uni.edu/cme/hh_month.htm Contact: Lydia Perez Roberts, email: lydia.roberts@uni.edu; phone: 319-273-2250.

Wednesday, Oct. 26

'The Middle East,' a Lifelong University course, will meet from 10 to 11:30 a.m., in Classroom 30 of the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center. The course will offer a broad overview of the Middle East, including the nations of the Middle East, politics, Islamic faith and its role in the lives of Middle Easterners, and human rights issues. Contact: Stacey Christensen, (319) 273-3170 or E-mail stacey.christensen@uni.edu.

30th Teacher Education Induction Convocation will be at 3:30 p.m., in the Great Hall of the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center, with 315 UNI students eligible for formal admission into the teacher education program. Barry Wilson, UNI associate professor of education and director of assessment, is the Convocation speaker. Contact: Barbara Hill, (319) 273-2265.

Ashley Hinz, a participant in the Summer 2005 Humanities & Fine Arts study abroad program in St. Petersburg, Russia, will speak about the program and her experiences at 4 p.m. at the University Honors Cottage, 2401 College St., Cedar Falls. A contact from the Study Abroad office will be available to answer questions. Contact: Ashley Hinz, (319) 230-4290.

Thursday, Oct. 27

Sigma Xi lecture on Intelligent Design will be at 7 p.m., 244/245 Schindler Education Center. John Staver, the director of the Center for Science Education, Kansas State University, will present 'Intelligent Design vs. Evolution: It's Time to Saddle Up and Draw a Hard Line.' Staver was a member of the board that re-wrote the science standards for the state of Kansas that emphasize evolution. He will provide information on the rhetoric, strategies and foundations of intelligent design. Contact: Paul Shand, UNI associate professor of physics ands sigma Xi program chair, (319) 273-2930.

Camerata Nordica, one of Scandinavia's leading chamber orchestras, will be conducting a free, open rehearsal at 6 p.m., in the Great Hall of the Gallagher-Bluedorn Performing Arts Center, prior to its 7:30 performance there. The rehearsal will allow observers to catch a glimpse into the preparation and discipline members maintain to achieve their world-class talents. Contact: Janelle Darst, (319) 273-3676 or E-mail Janelle.darst@uni.edu

Friday, Oct. 28

The Study Abroad Center will host an open house from 1 to 5 p.m., 161 Baker Hall. Featured will be a variety of exhibits and materials about international opportunities in more than 30 countries for UNI undergraduate and graduate students. Program coordinators and study abroad veterans will be available to answer questions and share their experiences. Contact: Yana Cornish, (319) 273-7078, or E-mail yana.cornish@uni.edu

The Student Health Center Grand Opening will begin with a 3 p.m. program, followed by an open house and tours, until 5 p.m., of its newly-completed addition and renovation. A flu clinic for the campus community also will take place. Contact: Kathy Green, (319) 273-6921.

A Family Fest Dance Concert, will be presented at 7:30 p.m., free of charge, in the Russell Hall Auditorium, sponsored by the UNI International Dance Theatre and Orchesis Dance Company. (Also offered at 2 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 30.) Contact: Kathleen Kerr, UNI professor of physical education, (319) 273-6195 or E-mail kerr@uni.edu

Friday, Oct. 28 - Sunday, Oct. 30

Family Weekend at UNI will feature campus-wide activities, including a tour of Iowa art, UNI volleyball and football games, and meals at the Piazza or the Rialto dining centers. For a complete schedule, visit the family weekend Web site at www.uni.edu/familyweekend. Contact: Jon Buse, (319) 273-2897.

Saturday, Oct. 29

Fun with Bats will be the topic for a University Museum program from 10 a.m. to noon. Activities will include making masks, reading books and viewing videos, an eco-location activity and more. Special program at 10:30 presented by Jim Demastes, UNI associate professor of biology. The University Museum is located at 3219 Hudson Road, Cedar Falls. Contact the Museum at (319) 273-2188.

Chemistry magic shows will be presented at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. by the UNI Student Affiliates of the American Chemical Society, in McCollum Science Hall, Room 201. Visitors also may explore ChemWall, the chemistry department's unique interactive periodic table. Contact: Cheryl Smith, program associate, UNI College of Natural Sciences, (319) 273-6809.

Sunday, Oct. 30

A Family Fest Dance Concert, will be presented at 2 p.m., free of charge, in the Russell Hall Auditorium, sponsored by the UNI International Dance Theatre and Orchesis Dance Company. Contact: Kathleen Kerr, UNI professor of physical education, (319) 273-6195 or E-mail kerr@uni.edu

Monday, Oct. 31 - Tuesday, Nov. 29

The '2005 Department of Art Faculty Exhibition' will open in the UNI Gallery of Art, running through Nov. 29. An opening reception will begin at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Nov. 1. Contact: Darrell Taylor, director, UNI Gallery of Art, (319) 273-6134, or E-mail GalleryOfArt@uni.edu

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa Public Interest Research Group (UNI-PIRG), will host a day of action in opposition to the 'Budget Reconciliation Act,' Wednesday,















Oct. 26.















A news conference regarding the Budget Reconciliation Act and Financial Aid will take place at 10 a.m., Wednesday, Oct. 26, in Maucker Union's Old Central Ballroom C, on the UNI campus. Speakers at the news conference include UNI President Robert Koob; Joyce Morrow, UNI associate director of financial aid; UNI Student Body President Joseph Murphy from Dubuque; Jason Whisler, a UNI history graduate student and member of UNI-PIRG from Yale; and, Alana Stamas of Iowa PIRG.















Personal testimony will be provided by UNI students. The organization is seeking representation from other groups affected by the Act, such as the Iowa AARP (American Association of Retired Persons), the local AMVETs (American Veterans), and the Iowa AFSCME (American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees).















Following the news conference, UNI-PIRG members will host a call-in event and demonstration called 'Stop the Raid on Student Aid,' to inform students about the Act and ask them to call their elected representatives and voice their opposition.















Within the coming weeks, Congress is set to vote on the Budget Reconciliation Act. According to Whisler, this Act includes massive cuts to Medicaid, Medicare, veterans' benefits, workers' pensions and around $9 billion to financial aid -- the largest cuts ever. It is estimated that the average student would face an increased debt load of $5,800 if this Act is passed. Faced with rising tuition as well as increasing, and often times, unmanageable debt, students will be asked to speak up and tell Congress to protect their opportunity to receive an affordable education and to not place the burden of the National Deficit on their shoulders.















UNI-PIRG, is a nationally affiliated student organization that runs campaigns on issues that relate to students. This fall, members of UNI-PIRG have sponsored call-in days in which nearly 100 students called congressional representatives to lobby against the Budget Reconciliation Act. They have lobbied Iowa Congressman Jim Nussle, and have collected approximately 1,200 signatures from students and faculty in opposition to the Act.































'UNI Student PIRG members feel strongly that students should be informed on legislation that could have such a drastic effect on their ability to obtain a college education,' said Whisler. 'They have been working for months to increase student awareness and force legislators to take students' concerns seriously, and will continue their efforts to get students' concerns addressed and their voices heard.'































For more information on the Budget Reconciliation Act and financial aid, visit www.studentaidaction.com/aid.asp?id=1157, or contact Whisler at (843) 655-1607.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- 'Intelligent Design vs. Evolution: It's Time to Saddle Up and Draw a Hard Line' will be the topic at the University of Northern Iowa Thursday, Oct. 27, as John Staver, professor of science education and director of the Center for Science Education at Kansas State University, presents the 'other side' of the ID argument.































Staver will speak at 7 p.m., in Room 244/245 Schindler Education Center, as part of UNI's Sigma Xi Lecture Series. He is the second of two speakers on this controversial topic that has become a topic of debate in the national news media. His presentation is free and open to the public.















In September, Staver spoke to the monthly meeting of the Kansas Board of Education, where he delivered a message from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, of which he is a fellow. The AAAS expressed concern 'about the changes that have been made in the Kansas Science Education Standards in order to discredit the theory of evolution.' Staver was a member of the committee that rewrote the science standards for the state of Kansas that emphasize evolution.















A group of 38 Nobel laureates also sent a letter to the Kansas board deploring 'efforts by the proponents of so-called 'intelligent design' to politicize scientific inquiry, and described ID itself as 'fundamentally unscientific because its central conclusion is based on belief in the intervention of a supernatural agent.'















In outlining his topic for the UNI presentation, Staver said since the early 1990s, advocates of ID theory have claimed that a genuine scientific controversy exists over evolutionary theory, and that public school science teachers should teach this controversy. 'Rarely do ID advocates present at meetings of scientific societies and support their presentations with empirical evidence.,' Staver said 'Rarely is their scientific research on ID theory published in the refereed scientific research literature.'















He will look at ID advocates' motivations, rationales and goals in this work and talk about how scientists, science educators and teachers, and the public should respond.















Last month, Guillermo Gonzalez gave the first Sigma Xi lecture at UNI for the 2005-2006 academic year. He is a Senior Fellow of the Discovery Institute, a conservative think tank that supports the study of ID, the idea that certain features on earth and in the universe are so unique they could not have evolved randomly, but had to be created by an intelligent designer.















Paul Shand, UNI associate professor of physics, is president-elect of the UNI Sigma Xi chapter and its program chair. He said that he hopes that the two lectures will serve to educate the public about intelligent design and the nature of scientific inquiry.















Sigma Xi, the international honor society of science and engineering, has nearly 65,000 members who were elected to membership based on their research potential or achievements. More than 500 Sigma Xi chapters in North America and around the world provide a supportive environment for interdisciplinary research at colleges and universities, industry research centers and government laboratories. Almost 200 members have won the Nobel Prize.















For more information, contact Paul Shand at (319) 273-2930 or E-mail Paul.Shand@uni.edu. ###















October 20, 2005 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa's Orchesis Dance Company and International Dance Theatre will present their 2005 Friends and Family Weekend Dance Concerts, at UNI's Russell Hall Auditorium on Friday, Oct. 28, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, Oct. 30, at 2 p.m.































According to Michelle Ozmun, instructor in physical education, this year's program will feature a mixture of original and traditional dance works from student and faculty choreographers. 'The audience will have the opportunity to see ballet, jazz and modern dances as well as folk dances from Germany, Hungary, Peru, Poland and Russia, and American Clogging and Swing,' said Ozmun. 'Dances featured will include encore performances of some of the finest pieces from last year, as well as premier works from faculty and students.' Approximately 26 students and two faculty members of both companies will present previews of works with which they will represent UNI at the American College Dance Festival, to be held at the University of Iowa, in March 2006.















The performances will last approximately one hour and fifteen minutes. According to Ozmun, the performances are family oriented and suitable for all audiences, and showcase the diversity and excellence of the dance forms taught at UNI.















Members of both companies are UNI students, at both undergraduate and graduate levels, and UNI faculty, as well as community members.















The house opens a half-hour before each performance. Russell Hall Auditorium is handicapped-accessible. Admission is free and seating is on a first-come first-served basis.















For further information, contact Ozmun at (319) 273-3560, or Kathleen Kerr, UNI professor of physical education, at (319) 273-6195.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- The University of Northern Iowa will celebrate the grand opening of its Student Health Center (SHC), with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at 3 p.m., Friday, Oct. 28, followed by an open house until 5 p.m. The center is located on West 23rd Street near Minnesota Street on the UNI campus.















The $3.5 million building project included extensive renovation and expansion to the facility, originally built in 1961 when the UNI student population was 4,000.















The new SHC brings the health clinic, pharmacy, counseling center and disability services together for improved access and coordination of health services to the UNI campus community, according to Kathy Green, UNI director of health services. New features include an expanded pharmacy and over-the-counter product services, more exam rooms for patient privacy, a triage and immunization program area, improved counseling and disability services space, infrastructure and technology improvements and modern medical accommodations in a welcoming and comfortable environment designed with a student-centered approach.















'The facility now reflects the quality, expertise, and dedication of its licensed physicians, physician assistants, pharmacist, nurses, psychologists, counselors and other professionals who are specialists in college health,' says Kathy Green, UNI director of health services.















Speaking at the ceremony will be: Robert Koob, UNI president; Jenny Rokes, UNI history major and member of the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, from Dike; Jeff Scudder, a UNI graduate and president of the Northern Iowa Student Government (NISG) from 2002 to 2003; Joe Murphy, UNI economics major and current NISG president from Worcester, Mass.; Sue Courts, UNI Student Health Clinic director; and David Towle, UNI Counseling Center and Disability Services director.















Music will be provided by the UNI School of Music's Capriccio Quintet. The musicians are sophomore music major Frida Linderang, of Eksjo, Sweden; graduate library science student Gretchen Rusch, of Muscatine; junior speech-language pathology major Megan Else, of Toledo; junior music major Amanda Goepferich, of Des Moines; and graduate music student Maricel Andrei, of Cedar Falls.















For more information, contact Green at (319) 273-6921































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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Students, faculty, staff and the public will have a chance to explore international learning experiences at the University of Northern Iowa Study Abroad Open House, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., Friday, Oct. 28, in Room 161, Baker Hall. Displays also will be set up, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 29, in the Curris Business Building, Schindler Education Center, McCollum Science Center, Industrial Technology Center, Wright Hall and the Center for Energy & Environmental Education (CEEE).

According to Katie Erickson, peer advisor at the Study Abroad Center, UNI's Study Abroad Program offers more than 300 programs in 40 countries. 'Many courses are taught in English, but some programs focus on language learning,' said Erickson. 'Students may choose programs ranging from two weeks to a full year.'

Past participants of the Study Abroad Program will be present to visit with students about their experiences abroad, as well as international students studying at UNI on exchange. Peer advisors also will be available to answer questions about the Study Abroad Program.

Door prizes and refreshments will be provided.

For more information, contact Erickson at (319) 273-7078 or study-abroad@uni.edu, or visit www.uni.edu/studyabroad.

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa --The support of her family upon returning to college after a 17-year hiatus was a strong factor in a mother nominating her family, the Even family of Gilbertville, to be the University of Northern Iowa's 2005 Family of the Year.

The Even family will be honored Saturday, Oct. 29, at the Family Weekend tailgate event, and will receive recognition at halftime of UNI's 3 p.m. football game with the Penguins of Youngstown State University.

Family members includes parents, Eugene and Paula, and their five children. Sons Chris and Wes graduated with their mother two years ago when she received her B.A. degree in earth science. Chris majored in technology management and Wes in physics. Their son Russ, is a UNI double major in physics and public administration; their daughter Amanda is a UNI freshman majoring in earth science; and son Matt, plans to enter UNI in 2007, majoring in either earth science or physics.

Paula, who received her master's degree in environmental programs from UNI in May, says the most significant effect her family has had on her is to make her always want to do her best in school and learn as much as possible.

'I am grateful for the opportunity to be here and would not be without their support and sacrifices,' wrote Paul in her nomination. 'My second son said to me, as he graduated from high school, 'Come to college with me, Mom.' He knew I had always wanted to complete college. I am very blessed to have a family who has supported and encouraged me to follow my dreams.'

Paula, who began her undergraduate career as a home economics major, joined him and changed her major to earth science. She says she is a better person because of her family's support for one another. Not only did this help her become a more giving, patient and flexible person as she struggled to accommodate everyone's schedules, but also it helped her to keep sight of what she says is most important in life, each other.

'I make an effort to bring everyone together to celebrate holidays and special occasions, as well as to relax together on a Sunday afternoon,' she wrote. 'I have learned to make time for the simple things in life, like sitting under the stars on a summer evening and talking for hours to my children.

'My family truly is a UNI family and has played an important role in my collegiate experience, with all of them assisting me in some way throughout my college career. Chris proofed my papers while Russ gave me graphic advice. My husband, Amanda and Matt assisted me in collecting samples and taking pictures for projects.'

But she says son, Wes, has played the most significant role, patiently tutoring her for 'countless hours' in calculus and physics, as well as providing computer guidance. In the two classes they took together, they were often busy typing away at their computers, calling out questions to each other, while in an observational astronomy class, they spent several nights out until the 'wee hours of the morning' gathering data for their projects.

He also was willing to pitch in and cook a meal or take his little brother to scout functions if she had a test to study for or a paper to write.

'My family's support has played such a vital part in my being able to go to college, and UNI has been such an important part of our family.'

The Family of the Year program is sponsored by the UNI Family Weekend Committee. For more information on UNI's Family Weekend, visit www.uni.edu/familyweekend

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- To celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month and the Day of the Dead, the University of Northern Iowa Center for Multicultural Education (CME) will host a variety of events during the week of Oct. 24 to 28, on the UNI campus.

Activities include a free authentic Mexican lunch and live entertainment by Las Guitarras de Mexico, a southern Mexico guitar quartet, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 25, in the CME. Las Guitarras de Mexico has been performing throughout the United States for nearly 20 years. Endorsed by the Iowa Arts Council (IAC), it is noted in the IAC's Folklife Resource Directory as the authentic traditional Mexican performance group in Central Iowa.

'Day of the Dead,' a documentary film, will play every half hour from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Monday through Friday, Oct. 24 to 28. The film describes the Mexican holiday, Day of the Dead, which takes place on Oct. 31. During this time people all over Mexico pay their respects to their deceased family members by decorating gravestones and cooking elaborate meals. They also build altars adorned with paper mache skulls and memorabilia of lost loved ones such as pictures.

An authentic 'Day of the Dead' altar will be on display all month in the CME lobby. According to Lydia Roberts, director at the CME, candy will be offered at the altar for anyone who visits. 'There is a significance to the candy offering as part of this Aztec tradition, since it is believed that spirits of children who have passed away visit the altars and take the candy treats that are left out for them,' she said.

For further information, visit http://www.uni.edu/cme, or contact Roberts, at Lydia.Roberts@uni.edu or (319) 273-2250.

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October 19, 2005 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Theatre UNI will present 'Three Mutants: Plays about Girls,' written and directed by guest artist Lisa D'Amour. The performance will take place at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 25, in Room 108 of the Communication Arts Center on the UNI campus.































D'Amour's three plays, 'Dreams of a West-Texas Marsupial Girl,' 'Monique the Mosquito Takes First Runner Up' and 'Autopsy,' examine beauty, bravery and girls' searches for identity.































A native of New Orleans, D'Amour is a playwright and performer who often writes and performs work specific to location. While in residence with Theatre UNI, she will conduct a workshop for students that explores the connection between 'accidental' behavior and authenticity in performance, titled 'Theatre of Accident.'































'Three Mutants: Plays about Girls' is part of Theatre UNI's Off-Hudson Series of Staged Readings. UNI senior theatre major, Leo Murzenko of St. Petersburg, Russia, will serve as assistant director to D'Amour. A discussion with the playwright/director will follow. For more information, contact Jascenna Haislet-Carlson, Theatre UNI marketing director, at (319) 273-6387.















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October 18, 2005 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Six teachers and educational administrators from England, Ireland and Denmark will be at the University of Northern Iowa for the 2005 International Alliance Fall Tour. UNI's Out-of-State and International Student Teaching Program will host the educators from Thursday, Oct. 20, through Thursday, Oct. 27.































The International Alliance Tour strengthens the partnerships among schools participating in the international student teacher program through teacher education and curriculum instruction. UNI often works with alliance members to find international placement opportunities for UNI student teachers. This is the first year the tour has come to UNI.































'The tour gives us a way to have an international connection while sharing teaching perspectives,' said Lowell Hoeft, an instructor in the Office of Student Field Experiences and coordinator of UNI's Out-of State and International Student Teacher Program. 'We all benefit from each other.'































During the tour, the six educators will give a presentation on their countries' curriculums and classroom management styles at Malcolm Price Laboratory School during the Price Lab Teacher Institute on Friday, Oct. 21. The presentation is open to UNI education students, faculty and area educators. The tour participants will also tour the UNI campus, participate in discussions with UNI education faculty and students, observe local elementary, middle and high schools, and visit some of Iowa's historic landmarks.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Sixteen University of Northern Iowa students are participating in the National Student Exchange (NSE) program during the fall semester of 2005.















(Name) of (Hometown) is a (Classification) majoring in (Major) . He/She is attending (Institution).















The NSE offers students the opportunity to attend one of 179 colleges and universities across the United States and Canada for one or two semesters while paying UNI tuition. Students must have a UNI and cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75 and be a sophomore or junior while on exchange. Nearly 800 UNI students have participated in the NSE since 1977.















'The NSE program provides our students with a unique opportunity to enhance the excellent academic, social and cultural experiences they are currently receiving at UNI,' says Karen Cunningham, UNI program coordinator for individual studies. 'Since some of our students have never had the opportunity to travel beyond the immediate area, we believe NSE often expands their social and cultural awareness in a very significant way.'















An informational meeting for those interested in participating in the NSE program for 2006-2007 will take place at 3:30 p.m., Monday, Oct. 24, in the Elm Room, Maucker Union. For more information, contact Cunningham at (319) 273-2504.































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October 17, 2005 - 7:00pm

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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- Employees who work in the University of Northern Iowa's Gilchrist Hall should not report to work Tuesday, Oct. 18, unless contacted by their supervisors. This will allow for continued cleaning throughout the building following an early-morning fire Sunday.































'It will be at least two weeks before most of the people who work in Gilchrist Hall can move back in,' said Tom Schellhardt, vice president for administration and finance. 'Our tentative target date for reopening most of the building is Nov. 1.'































The Follon Student Services Center general information desk and basic student services, including admissions, financial aid, cashier, bill payment, registrar, academic advising and career services have been temporarily relocated to the second floor of Maucker Union. Gilchrist office phone numbers are operational.































A list of where other Gilchrist offices have been relocated will be posted on the UNI Web site (www.uni.edu) as soon as the information is available.















Gilchrist Hall is one of three university buildings to which UNI Police and Cedar Falls Fire Department crews responded between midnight and 1:15 a.m. Sunday. Other calls were to Baker Hall and Lang Hall, where smoke damage was less extensive. These incidents remain under investigation. Both Lang Hall and Baker Hall are open for business and classes.















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CEDAR FALLS, Iowa -- At approximately 6:25 a.m. today, University of Northern Iowa Police and the Cedar Falls Fire Department responded to a fire outside 109 F Street, in UNI's Hillside Courts apartment complex. The fire was located in a small utility structure adjacent to the apartment building. No one was injured in the fire. The incident is under investigation by UNI Police.















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Two days of events on the University of Northern Iowa campus Thursday and Friday, Oct. 20-21, will culminate with the Friday, noon dedication of the Elinor A. Crawford & William R. Thrall Hall of Excellence, near the main lobby of UNI's Wellness & Recreation Center. The hall was developed through UNI's School of Health, Physical Education & Leisure Services to acknowledge program graduates who have distinguished themselves as professionals, and to encourage currently enrolled students to strive toward this recognition.















The hall also includes an historical timeline of academic and other programs related to the work of the school and its predecessor departments and recognition of those who have served in leadership roles within the school.















Twenty-four graduates were named to the Charter Class of 2004, prior to completion of the hall. Four additional graduates have been named to the Class of 2005. They are: Neil W. Hattlestad, B.A. '61, M.A. '65, professor of kinesiology and dean of the College of Health & Behavioral Sciences at the University of Central Arkansas since 1983; Iradge Ahrabi-Fard, B.A. '65, M.A. '66, professor of physical education and former head volleyball coach at UNI; Patricia Geadelmann, B.A. '70, special assistant to the president at UNI for board and governmental relations; and the late Lyle Schwarzenbach, B.A. '67, M.A. '68, UNI professor of physical education and coordinator of general education and, at the time of his death in 1993, administrative assistant in HPELS.















All will be honored at an induction brunch at 9 a.m. Friday in the Slife Ballroom of the Commons at UNI. Thursday evening, a 5:30 p.m. reception will take place in the Great Reading Room in Seerley Hall.















UNI's School of HPELS is one of the oldest programs in the United States, tracing its roots to 1896 with the establishment of the Department of Physical Culture. Course work in physical education dates to 1878, just two years after UNI's founding as the Iowa State Normal School. In 1978, the current school was established, combining the men's and women's physical education programs.















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